Hera and the Peacocks tail……

HERA and the Peacocks tail

HERA and the Peacocks tail

Hera was the wife of Zeus and is seen as the goddess of women and marriage. Hera is often shown with a pomegranate an emblem of fertile blood and death.  Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus’s lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her, such as Pelias. Paris also earned Hera’s hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess. Both Hera and Demeter have many characteristic attributes of pre-Greek Great Goddesses. There has been considerable scholarship, about the possibility that Hera, whose early importance in Greek religion is firmly established, was originally the goddess of a matriarchal people, presumably inhabiting Greece before the Hellenes. In this view, her activity as goddess of marriage established the patriarchal bond of her own subordination: her resistance to the conquests of Zeus is rendered as Hera’s “jealousy”, the main theme of literary anecdotes that undercut her ancient cult.

Hera’s chariot was pulled by peacocks …… a bird sacred to Her. In ALCHEMY  the Peacock stage, symbolises that the alchemist has entered into the inner experience of the astral world, which initially appears as ever shifting patterns of color. This experience is often symbolized in alchemy by the appropriate image of the peacock’s tail with its splendid iridescence of color. In terms of this series of five stages, the turning point is reached with the Peacock. Up until this point the alchemist has experienced aspects of his being which he was formerly unconscious of – the etheric forces and the astral body. Essentially these experiences have happened to him, although he had to make himself open to the experiences through entering into the initial Black Crow state, however, in order to progress he must begin to work upon his inner being.

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About redseedsgatherer

Linda Hill
This entry was posted in alchemy, Art, Goddess, Mythology, Print-making, spirituality, women and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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